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Sheetal Mafatlal decodes the trending logo craze in fashion

Logo Mania Rules: Sheetal Mafatlal decodes fashion’s hottest trend du jour, which has been embraced by the glitterati and cinemarati with elan…

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Every fashion season ends up being a palatecleanser. If Fall Winter signals the comeback of statement feathers and shine-on sequins, then Spring Summer makes way for sleek minimalism and refined silhouettes or viceversa. The last five fashion weeks which include couture, ready-to-wear, resort and pre-fall, have seen designers and luxury conglomerates leaving no stone unturned to appeal to the Millennials and Gen Z, who are reportedly driving luxury sales.

While a few seasons ago, there was a push in the luxury space to embrace logo-less products and toning down the brand mentions, fashion today seems to be moving towards a scenario of ‘If you’ve got it, flaunt it’. Hence, most design houses have gone back to their rich archives and brought back their key insignia, and re-presented them with an of-the-moment flourish. Also, the new season has heralded the introduction of new logos.

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Sheetal Mafatlal wearing Balenciaga

The new-age Burberry under the talented Riccardo Tisci has introduced ‘T’ in the British label’s emblem (an homage to its founder Thomas Burberry), and the French heritage house Balmain, under its social media star designer Olivier Rousteing, has reimagined their symbol.

Logo frenzy has been the mainstay over the past few seasons and its escalating popularity shows no signs of fading out. An offshoot of the grunge 90s, the logo craze has reached new heights with design houses like Fendi, Gucci and Balenciaga warming up to it like never before. From T-shirts emblazoned with brands’ letterings, to sneakers printed with it all over – they make for chic travel companions.

Over the last few seasons, Vetements — the cutting edge, street-inflected label has been a recurring presence in my closet. Its dynamic designer Demna Gvasalia (who is also the force behind the revival of Balenciaga) has defined and refined street style, and made tracksuits unimaginably uber-chic. Currently, I’m digging their twin-set casuals and ripped denims.

Also worth mentioning is the ever so subtle Lanvin — a label which too couldn’t resist the all-encompassing allure of the logo madness. The design house has succumbed and plastered the label name all over their silk dresses and playsuits.

Gucci, under the aegis of maverick minstrel Alessandro Michele, has always been at the forefront of developing a new design vocabulary. The Italian brand playfully spelled out their name as ‘Guccy’ (as in teddy) on jumpers and T-shirts, which became a rage on Instagram. Fendi’s offerings, like their mink zipper vests and varsity jackets, come unapologetically embossed with bold FF.

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Sheetal Mafatlal’s column Logo Mania Rules featured in CineBlitz March 2019 issue.

A classic label like Max Mara’s runway too had sling bags echoing the label’s letterings, and Moschino’s jumper dresses come kissed with the brand name. Maria Grazia Chiuri at Dior brought back the ‘J’adior’ from their rich archive-showcased coats and feminist T-shirts with the brand’s name printed on it.

Every brand that promoted a discreet no logo look has not only joined the trending logo mania, but even created logos to partake in the frenzy… the best example being Valentino with their 80’s revived logo VLTN. Ask any fashion observer the logic behind logos’ resurgence, and they’re likely to say that these pieces spark off an immediate connect with the brand.

While it’s one thing to stay on trend, blindly aping the runway and catalogues isn’t smart. It’s all about striking the right balance, between style and comfort, structure and fluidity, form and function, neutrals and metallics, separates and accessories. Also, each piece you don should reflect your personal style, but be warned that mixing logos will create a ‘fashion police’ alert.

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