Connect with us

Celeb Columns

Sheetal Mafatlal decodes the trending logo craze in fashion

Logo Mania Rules: Sheetal Mafatlal decodes fashion’s hottest trend du jour, which has been embraced by the glitterati and cinemarati with elan…

Published at

on

Every fashion season ends up being a palatecleanser. If Fall Winter signals the comeback of statement feathers and shine-on sequins, then Spring Summer makes way for sleek minimalism and refined silhouettes or viceversa. The last five fashion weeks which include couture, ready-to-wear, resort and pre-fall, have seen designers and luxury conglomerates leaving no stone unturned to appeal to the Millennials and Gen Z, who are reportedly driving luxury sales.

While a few seasons ago, there was a push in the luxury space to embrace logo-less products and toning down the brand mentions, fashion today seems to be moving towards a scenario of ‘If you’ve got it, flaunt it’. Hence, most design houses have gone back to their rich archives and brought back their key insignia, and re-presented them with an of-the-moment flourish. Also, the new season has heralded the introduction of new logos.

sheetal-mafatlal-balenciaga

Sheetal Mafatlal wearing Balenciaga

The new-age Burberry under the talented Riccardo Tisci has introduced ‘T’ in the British label’s emblem (an homage to its founder Thomas Burberry), and the French heritage house Balmain, under its social media star designer Olivier Rousteing, has reimagined their symbol.

Logo frenzy has been the mainstay over the past few seasons and its escalating popularity shows no signs of fading out. An offshoot of the grunge 90s, the logo craze has reached new heights with design houses like Fendi, Gucci and Balenciaga warming up to it like never before. From T-shirts emblazoned with brands’ letterings, to sneakers printed with it all over – they make for chic travel companions.

Over the last few seasons, Vetements — the cutting edge, street-inflected label has been a recurring presence in my closet. Its dynamic designer Demna Gvasalia (who is also the force behind the revival of Balenciaga) has defined and refined street style, and made tracksuits unimaginably uber-chic. Currently, I’m digging their twin-set casuals and ripped denims.

Also worth mentioning is the ever so subtle Lanvin — a label which too couldn’t resist the all-encompassing allure of the logo madness. The design house has succumbed and plastered the label name all over their silk dresses and playsuits.

Gucci, under the aegis of maverick minstrel Alessandro Michele, has always been at the forefront of developing a new design vocabulary. The Italian brand playfully spelled out their name as ‘Guccy’ (as in teddy) on jumpers and T-shirts, which became a rage on Instagram. Fendi’s offerings, like their mink zipper vests and varsity jackets, come unapologetically embossed with bold FF.

sheetal-mafatlal-logo-mania-rules

Sheetal Mafatlal’s column Logo Mania Rules featured in CineBlitz March 2019 issue.

A classic label like Max Mara’s runway too had sling bags echoing the label’s letterings, and Moschino’s jumper dresses come kissed with the brand name. Maria Grazia Chiuri at Dior brought back the ‘J’adior’ from their rich archive-showcased coats and feminist T-shirts with the brand’s name printed on it.

Every brand that promoted a discreet no logo look has not only joined the trending logo mania, but even created logos to partake in the frenzy… the best example being Valentino with their 80’s revived logo VLTN. Ask any fashion observer the logic behind logos’ resurgence, and they’re likely to say that these pieces spark off an immediate connect with the brand.

While it’s one thing to stay on trend, blindly aping the runway and catalogues isn’t smart. It’s all about striking the right balance, between style and comfort, structure and fluidity, form and function, neutrals and metallics, separates and accessories. Also, each piece you don should reflect your personal style, but be warned that mixing logos will create a ‘fashion police’ alert.

Celeb Columns

The TURBAN gets uber-chic: Sheetal Mafatlal decodes the timeless headgear

Style maven Sheetal Mafatlal dwells on the transformative appeal of the timeless headgear, which has emerged as the ‘it’ accessory du jour.

Published at

on

sheetal-mafatlal-fashion-turban
Sheetal Mafatlal decodes turban fashion

Trust Gucci’s creative force, designer Alessandro Michele, to shake the fashion set out of its complacent slumber by showcasing an exquisite array of absolutely drool-worthy headgear. The game-changing creative head of the hallowed Italian luxury house turned the spotlight on the turban this season, by reinterpreting it in a no-holds-barred-glamazon format. The label’s Fall 2018 showcase in Milan saw a panoply of babushka hoods, pagoda hats and headscarves, that brought to mind exotic visions of the elegant hijabs and naqabs.

The fashion maverick Michele has dramatically changed the way we perceive accessories. A nifty headpiece can make or break an ensemble, and I’m totally digging the label’s multi-hued, bejewelled headpiece which is a reinvention of the ‘bandanna’ headband.

Over the years, I have thoroughly enjoyed wearing Michele’s accessories and ensembles, and his glittery and bold headdresses are my absolute favourite. Depending on my mood and the occasion, I have teamed my Gucci turbans with both, minimal and maximalist ensembles. Being a fan of the statement-making headpieces, I have often worn his bejewelled headbands as an alternative to a turban.

sheetal-mafatlal-red-turban

Sheetal Mafatlal clicked by Vickram Singh Bawa

Donatella Versace at the Gianni Versace ‘Tribute Collection’ in Milano, sent out his signature butterfly print turbans and Baroque print head scarves, worn with wrap dresses, bodysuits and matching accessories – all epitomising the house’s intrinsic Va Va Vroom.

The headdress has evolved over the years, with the early 20th century witnessing a major revival of the fashion turban, this time, worn mostly by elite women as a symbol of their cultivated sophistication. These headdresses always evoked a sense of exotica with their draped styles, and were often dubbed as ‘Easterninfluenced headpieces.’ In Europe, the iconic designer Paul Poiret was majorly impacted by Orientalism, whose take on the accessory conjured images of a fabled harem.

The turban pioneer is said to be credited for having revived the headpiece in the early 1900s. While in the ’20s, it had an exuberant flapper connotation, in the ’30s and ’40s, the headdress became a synonym for unabashed Hollywood glamour. Who could forget Greta Garbo in The Painted Veil (1934) and Lana Turner in The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946)?

After many years, model Marisa Berenson approached the turban with a relaxed and louche glam touch of the swinging ’70s. When Yves Saint Laurent worked in post-war France, he added headdresses to complement most of his looks suiting all occasions – be it haute couture or ready-to-wear. A pleated lamé turban ornamented with a sequined palm leaf created by Nina Wood, worn with an Indian inspired evening outfit from YSL’s Spring/Summer 1982 haute couture collection, remains one of the memorable looks.

sheetal-mafatlal-black-gold-turban

Sheetal Mafatlal clicked by Vickram Singh Bawa

In recent times, a slew of fashion films and chick-flick TV series have reignited the season-less appeal of the turban. In 2010, Carrie Bradshaw, essayed by Sarah Jessica Parker, elevated the headdress to another level of exotica as she played out her life with her girl pals against the stunning backdrop of Abu Dhabi in the film Sex and the City 2. Fashion industry heavyweights like Miuccia Prada, Jason Wu, Vena Cava and Giorgio Armani have re-purposed the turban, making it relevant for the young women of today, season after season.

Also worth mentioning is Jean Paul Gaultier’s sari collection for Hermes in 2011, which he accessorised with jewel-toned headpieces. In Bollywood, veteran actress Rekha has been the biggest proponent of this chic essential for years now. Teaming it with her ‘more is more’ ensemble, she has time and again, worn the turban with effortless elan and her characteristic nonchalance, bringing to mind her larger-than-life on-screen persona of her ‘80s Bollywood films.

This ‘of-the-moment’ interpretation of the classic turbans ushers in a new wave of exotic glamour in a scenario of austere runway presentations and a pall of gloom lurking on luxury retail. When the going gets tough, the fashionable get bold, and a turban addition to any ensemble adds that touch of chic femininity and a ‘look-at-me’ sass, unrivalled by any other accessory or jewellery.

Sheetal Mafatlal writes an exclusive monthly column on fashion for CineBlitz.

Also read: Sheetal Mafatlal demystifies French Riviera chic
Also read: Sheetal Mafatlal decodes the trending logo craze in fashion
Also read: Airports – The New Runways, Sheetal Mafatlal on airport fashion!
Also read: Deepika Padukone and Sonam K Ahuja broke the tradition; proved white is the new red for modern brides

Continue Reading

Celeb Columns

Mahesh Bhatt: You should learn what trusting a director means from Sridevi

Filmmaker Mahesh Bhatt recalls working with the late actor Sridevi, her commitment to work and her native charm that made her stand apart from the other leading ladies of those times

Published at

on

mahesh-bhatt-sridevi
Mahesh Bhatt recalls working with the late actor Sridevi on their film Gumraah

“She was the diva of the 80s who did the Tohfaas and the Himmatwaalas and you came into your own with path-breaking films like Arth and Saaransh. How did your paths cross?” asked a young writer who is chronicling the life of Sridevi, an actor par excellence, whose rise to the top was slow and steady, but the end, sudden and tragic.

I first met Sridevi in the dark auditorium of a cinema hall. She was up there on the silver screen. The film was Balu Mahendra’s Sadma in which she was paired opposite Kamal Haasan. What hit me about her persona was her earthiness. That undefinable native charm which was the unique attribute of this enigma, made her stand apart from the other leading ladies of those times.

The leading ladies who rose to the top in Mumbai had, because of westernisation, lost their feminine mystique. Most of them were modelling themselves on the western icons who appeared on international magazines or in Hollywood films. Since our leading ladies were monkeying the West, the core Indian audience was feeling deeply unfulfilled. Sridevi brought India back into Indian movies. This ‘India’ness became her springboard to super-stardom. For me, her best performance was in her husband Boney Kapoor’s Mr India, which was directed by Shekhar Kapur.

sridevi-mr-india

Sridevi in a still from the film Mr. India (1987)

“Let’s take Sridevi for this role, she is not only a star, but an actor of your kind,” said the late Yash Johar, the founder of Dharma Productions. After Naam, Aashiqui, Dil Hai Ke Maanta Nahi and Sadak, I too had become a bit of a star director. The reputation that I am an actor’s director became a bridge for Sridevi and me to meet and work in the early 90s in Gumrah. Working with Sridevi was a memorable experience.

The character of Roshni from Gumrah was a lot like Sridevi herself. All great performances are drawn out from the body of an actor. A good director is like a good gardener. He brings out the beauty of a plant from the DNA of the seed, by merely watering it and protecting it. I did not force-feed my ideas into this acting machine. I merely created an environment for her to bloom, which she did. Gumrah was a mediocre success, but if at all people remember that film, it’s because of her heartfelt performance.

gumraah-poster

Movie poster of Gumrah directed by Mahesh Bhatt and starring Sridevi and Sanjay Dutt. Courtesy: IMDb.com

“You should learn what trusting a director means from Sridevi, never did she question me for presenting her in the most deglamourised way in the jail portions of Gumrah,” I said to an actress in the 90s, when she was giving a hard time to my assistants by refusing to wear a “non glamorous” costume which the film demanded.

When I look back on her glorious innings in the movie world, I cannot help but conclude that long, successful career arcs do not happen by chance. They are fuelled by courage and discipline, and the ability to take risks. “Not taking risks is a bigger risk Madam,” I remember telling her when she was voicing her concern about some producers, for shedding her glamorous persona in Gumrah. My conviction was the lodestar which saw her all through the making of Gumrah.

How can I forget what she did during the shooting of the climax of Gumrah? “She has got very high fever Mahesh. I think we will have to cancel the shooting and break down the set,” said Yash Johar, as soon as I entered the massive prison set where a fight sequence was to be shot inside a water-tank. Yashji’s apprehensions were right.

There was no way I could ask this star to step into a water tank and participate in a fight sequence with Sanjay Dutt and Bob Christo. But the idea of re-erecting that massive set which cost a fortune was also weighing us down. But there was no way out.

“There is a way out. I am calling for my doctor, I will take an injection, get my fever down and shoot. Period. Just make sure that we keep the fans far away from me,” said Sridevi with a dead-pan face.

Tales of such magnanimity of film stars seldom reach the world. Demonising superstars is a profitable business. For me, the memory of Sridevi presenting Alia with her first award would have been an ideal image of a happy ending to our association. The body posture of Alia, awe-struck to see this diva bestow her with this prestigious award, is so life-affirming. But life makes you live on its own terms.

I had first met her in Centaur Hotel in a room full of roses, when Yashji and I had gone to sign her for Gumrah. It was her birthday. Little did I know then, I would one day see an image of Sridevi on a cold TV screen, lying dead, in a sea of flowers. Movies have a happy ending, this is real life.

Also read: Mahesh Bhatt recalls his relationship with Parveen Babi
Also read: Mahesh Bhatt: In Indian cinema, only bad people have sex, good people fall in love!
Also read: Mahesh Bhatt’s take on the fall of celebrities
Also read: Mahesh Bhatt: Blind obedience to authority has become the norm; we have become a population of sheep!

Continue Reading

Celeb Columns

Mahesh Bhatt: Blind obedience to authority has become the norm; we have become a population of sheep!

In an exclusive column for CineBlitz, veteran filmmaker Mahesh Bhatt writes, “It’s only when you question authority, and refuse to blindly follow those in the seat of power, that you create enduring works of art which resonate in the hearts of people years after they have been created.”

Published at

on

mahesh-bhatt

“Do you know more than the sages and the seers of this great country? Who are you to debunk the centuries old belief in Punar Janam (reincarnation)? Not only does it run counter to the beliefs of the millions of people of all faiths across the world, but it is also a guaranteed recipe for a Box-Office disaster,” said the patriarch of Rajshri Productions, Seth Tarachand Barjatya, waving his finger angrily at me. I had been summoned to the home of the Barjatyas on a Sunday morning by the late Raj Kumar Barjatya, to have a heart-to-heart conversation with his father, who was undoubtedly one of the tallest icons of the entertainment industry, and on whose shoulders Rajshri Productions had touched dizzying heights.

“Sethji is unhappy with the climax of Saaransh. He feels that he must meet you and prevail upon you to relent and change the climax of the film. I singularly lack the conviction to neutralise his demands. Moreover, please understand that each one of us is a prisoner of his or her own beliefs,” he had said to me meekly, moments before my conversation with the patriarch of the Rajshri empire began.

mahesh-bhatt-saaransh-arth

Movie posters of Arth (1982) and Saaransh (1984)

Maybe the late Raj Babu had put these thoughts in my mind because of my reputation which preceded me. The stories of me not yielding to the pressures of the film industry and changing the climax of Arth had become a part of Bollywood folklore. Raj Babu did not want us (Sethji and me), two fiercely opinionated individuals, to cross swords and disrupt the filming of Saaransh, which was racing towards completion.

“Why can’t the child that is born to this paying-guest be the reincarnation of the old couple’s dead son?” he asked. “Are you a sadist?” His question came from concern because his knowledge about the INDIAN audience was indeed far, far more and deeper than a filmmaker like me who had just one hit so far.

“Because my character of B B Pradhan (played by Anupam Kher) is an agnostic. Sir, if you stop believing in the life hereafter and put everything into what you possess into this living moment, you will truly awaken to the grandeur of life. This is the Saaransh of my film, Sir.” I remember, calmly, but firmly replying to him.

It was this unshakable conviction of mine which had infuriated the patriarch. Sensing the emotional temperature plummeting Raj Babu stepped in and acted with a sagacity which was indeed rare to find. I still remember his words, “Sethji, we have always believed in backing the director’s vision.

tarachand-barjatya-rajkumar-barjatya

Tarachand Barjatya (L) and Rajkumar Barjatya (R)

Look at the conviction of this young man, let us be bold enough to go ahead with his conviction, or else we will land up with a film which is neither here nor there.” Had it not been for Raj Babu, Saaransh wouldn’t have seen the light of day and become what it went out to become.

It was his faith in me that created this enduring classic. It was because of this unorthodox end which I had insisted upon, that Saaransh won the special Jury Award in 1984 at the Moscow Film Festival. My movies like Arth, Saaransh, Janam, Zakhm were born because of my fierce belief in the truth which was embedded in their DNA.

I often tell this to my junior writers and film directors to resist much and obey little. It’s only when you question authority, and refuse to blindly follow those in the seat of power, that you create enduring works of art which resonate in the hearts of people years after they have been created.

But sadly today, blind obedience to authority has become the norm. We have become a population of sheep. It’s heartbreaking to see young people conform so easily. Irreverence is the lifeblood of a flourishing society. People who obey blindly push society into the graveyard. The film industry must welcome and embrace those who are anti-authority because it is on their shoulders that the multi-billion-dollar film industry stands where it is. Where would we be without the irreverent spirit of the film makers of the bygone days?

Recently, when I launched the trailer of Ashvin Kumar’s No Fathers in Kashmir in Sunny Sound Service, I realised as long as there are filmmakers who have the guts to choose truth over illusions, our industry is safe.

There are two kinds of filmmakers. Ones that comfort the jolted and ones that jolt the comforted. Alas, the wheels of the Box-Office are run by these who pander to maintain status quo, and do everything to keep the illusions and the old prejudices of our society going. And then there is this microscopic minority of the latter.

These are the filmmakers who choose to tell the truth and resist the demands of the marketplace to manufacture illusions and lull the people to sleep. In this post-truth age, the need of the hour is to create a space for this brave lot.

Continue Reading

Trending

>