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Amavas movie review: Nargis Fakhri – Sachiin Joshi’s film is a stretched ghost drama that has nothing new

Amavas movie review: Nargis Fakhri – Sachiin Joshi’s ghost drama doesn’t stick to anything and loses everything…

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In an attempt to make a film with many twists in one, director Bhushan Patel made a dud, that seemed to me like never-ending suffering. It felt like someone pitched this idea and someone completely different actually invested money in it. But then, the credit roll cleared all my doubts. Produced by Raina ‘Sachiin Joshi’. Brother, you need to stop this!

What’s it about: All over the place, but let’s try. A happy couple on the verge of getting married decide to go on a vacation, as Karan (Sachiin Joshi) wants to propose to Ahana (Nargis Fakhri). Ahana wants to go to a place called ‘summer house’, don’t ask where, it’s a huge castle that belongs to Karan’s family. All the problems begin here. Karan has a bad memory from the past related to that castle that has been haunting him since a very long time. After getting in to the castle, ghostly events begin to take place, and that’s the rest of the film.

The film gets into many angles, haunted house, murder mystery, revenge story and a possessed character. But it doesn’t drive any point home. All the twists weave themselves into the screenplay and get loosely solved, till one of the leads dies (Yes, Spoiler!).

Yay: The only yay point was Mona Singh who plays a therapist, and well, a part-time exorcist of sorts. But she is the best actor of the ensemble which makes her a ray of hope. The castle is beautiful, and the set design is good.

Nay: When will we stop using the same female voice to dub for Nargis and Sunny Leone? The locations are based in London, the ‘summer house’ seems to be somewhere in Europe, and the three romantic songs take you to Venice. Tell me the exact location and the budget. This film is a checklist of all the pointers that Bollywood in its ghost films has portrayed, creaky doors, singing ghost, flashback of the ghost when alive and so on.

The film doesn’t stick to any specifics, and travels through twist after twist, making it a long stretched out, ghost amusement ride we never asked for. Acting came much later if it did at all, let’s not even talk about it. There were visibly  massive efforts from Sachiin’s side in dancing- too stiff, lip-synching -for himself, and romancing – like he’s afraid of the heroine, but, needless to say,  Sachiin failed to impress.

Cine Blitz Verdict: Make plans go out, visit places this week, but don’t head towards the theatre. It’s Amavas ki lambi raat!

 Ratings: 1/2 star

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Movie Reviews

Selection Day review: Netflix’s unconventional cricket drama is a must watch!

Selection Day, the Indian Netflix Original cricket drama avoids the sports film clichés and keeps you engaged in its uncertain turn of events. Here’s a review of part 1 and part 2 of this 12-episode series.

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Indians are obsessed with cricket. Generally, the kids are the ones who struggle to convince their parents to allow them to pursue cricket as a career. But in Selection Day, it is the father who is obsessed with making his two sons the best batsmen in the world – so much so that he calls them as Champion No. 1 and Champion No. 2 instead of their real names. Based on Aravind Adiga’s novel of the same name, Selection Day is an unconventional cricket drama. It avoids the clichés of a sports drama and focuses more on the inner and interpersonal conflict of characters.

The trio of father and sons come to Mumbai to get picked up by a school that has a cricket team so that they can apply for the Mumbai cricket team selection. Their rejections bring them to Weinberg Academy which is also struggling for funds and a win in the Harris Shield, a local cricket tournament in Mumbai. The cricket coach of the academy, who had given up coaching, spots the talent of the two boys at Shivaji Park during a stroll with his wife and gets them enrolled at Weinberg.

The journey of the trio begins and many layers and secrets of their relationship begin to unfold. Manjunath (Champion No. 2) doesn’t like cricket yet he’s playing it courtesy the tyranny of his father. Manju wants to become a scientist. Radha (Champion No. 1) is claimed by his father to become a better player than Sachin Tendulkar.

Watch the Selection Day trailer here:

Mohammad Samad (Tumbbad) and Yash Dholye as the two brothers (Manjunath and Radhakrishna) give a sincere performance. Karanvir Malhotra as the troublesome rich brat Javed Ansari has done justice to his layered character. Rajesh Tailang whom you must have adored as a cop in Delhi Crime plays the tyrant, manipulative and unlikeable father here. He’s too good as the bad guy. The effortless Ratna Pathak Shah as the Weinberg Academy’s head Nellie is a treat to watch. After a long time, Mahesh Manjrekar is seen in a refreshing role of the cricket coach Tommy Sir.

Netflix and other OTT platforms have given the Indian filmmakers and content creators the much-needed space and opportunity to tell authentic stories. Here (like Sacred Games), Maharashtrians speak nuanced Marathi, unlike in a mainstream Hindi film that would ridiculously mix languages for a wider audience to understand. Personally, I would rather read subtitles than listen to shabbily mixed languages in dialogues. The digital world has enabled storytellers to tell multilingual stories without compromising on the vision.

I haven’t read the novel by Aravind Adiga but the series is smartly written by Marston Bloom (Hindi dialogue by Sumit Arora) and finely executed by directors Udayan Prasad and Karan Boolani. Soumik Mukherjee has filmed Mumbai and maidan cricket with a fresh vision. Shashwat Sachdev’s (Uri: The Surgical Strike, Veere Di Wedding) music too avoids the sports drama clichés and the signature tune keeps playing in the head.

It seems like Selection Day was shot completely in one go and then divided into 12 episodes across two seasons. One might argue whether it could have been made into a feature-length film but a show is better. Feature films in India are limiting. And if the end of part 2 is any indication, I would be looking forward to Selection Day part 3.

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Kalank review: Varun, Alia, Sonakshi, Aditya, Sanjay and Madhuri’s period drama is heart-wrenchingly beautiful

Kalank review: Varun, Alia, Sonakshi, Aditya, Sanjay and Madhuri’s impactful romantic drama delves deep into the layered complex relationships

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Kalank has undoubtedly been one of the most highly-anticipated films in this quarter. The makers had over the weeks been treating us all with sneak-peeks of what to expect when the magnum opus releases. The one thing that stood out as a major highlight and became an instant talking point was the sheer grandeur of the film. The sets, the songs, even the casting… Everything spelt grand. The film, as we all know by now, stars Varun Dhawan, Alia Bhatt, Sonakshi Sinha, Aditya Roy Kapur, Sanjay Dutt and Madhuri Dixit.

The pairings itself generated a lot of buzz – Varun and Alia is already a hit pair, Sanjay – Madhuri is a pair reuniting on the big screen after more than two decades and so naturally is being looked forward to. Sonakshi and Aditya make for an interesting jodi too and their glimpses together looked promising. With so much to look forward to, there is obviously much excitement about Kalank. But does it live up to the hype and the expectations?

Read our full Kalank review to know!

What Kalank is all about: The year is 1946 and the film takes place in pre-partition Husnabad, outside Lahore. Now let us be very clear early on – though the film’s situations are largely triggered and driven by the communal tensions simmering in the months leading up to India’s Independence and partition in 1947, the film is fictionalised and not a historical account. So, if you expect slices of your history chapters being served to you, you will be disappointed. Instead, the film is about the complex relationships and the layered lives of the six lead characters and their emotions interweaved through the story set in the violent background of the partition.

The lead characters – Roop (Alia), Zafar (Varun), Satya (Sonakshi), Dev (Aditya), Balraj (Dutt), Begum Bahar (Madhuri) – are all distinctly different from each other. They are strongly defined by their individual personality traits. Every character’s fabric is built from a common thread of emotional turmoil. And it resonates with each character. Each character is fighting his or her own battle. This tone is set early in the film and it’s clear that the film is not going to be a peppy, breezy romantic fare. It’s dark and intense, brightened only by the grand and lavish backdrop along with the occasional naach-gaana.

So, Satya is suffering from cancer with only one year to survive. Like a dutiful, mature wife and bahu, she sacrifices her own happiness to ensure that her husband will stay happy even after her death. The solution: She gets her husband – a silent and broody, Dev married to Roop, who is somewhat a rebel at heart and agrees to the matrimony only as a compromise. Balraj Chaudhry is the strict patriarch of the affluent Chaudhry family upholding the family values. The father-son (Balraj and Dev) are at loggerheads not only on personal matters, but also political views and opinions when it comes to running their newspaper.

On a parallel track is the dark and infamous world of Heera Mandi that also houses the palatial kotha of Begum Bahar, the renowned courtesan. It is here that Zafar works as an ironsmith. A flamboyant, yet angst-ridden character, his anger stems from being the illegitimate child of Bahar and Balraj and being addressed like-wise. He finds his solace in women, his chief interest being a nautch girl (Kiara Advani).

Nurturing her heart-break since years, Bahar is even shunned by her son. Zafar harbours a strong hatred towards Balraj and his family as much as he does towards his mother. He aids Abdul (Kunal Kemmu) in working towards spreading unrest aimed at harming the newspaper run by Balraj. Roop drawn to Bahar’s voice goes to Heera Mandi. Eventually, she gets the Chaudhry family to agree and allow her to learn music from Bahar. There Roop runs into Zafar and the ground is set for the most-sizzling chemistry we have seen in recent times. It is intense! Roop, who anyway felt trapped in a loveless marriage with Dev, falls for Zafar. The attraction of forbidden love is unhinged.

As the story progresses, the characters find themselves locked in a never-ending emotional tussle. Sonakshi and Aditya are coming to terms with having a new wife in the picture, Alia being drawn to Varun, who is struggling with acceptance. And of course, there’s Dutt struggling to make peace with his past mistake and Madhuri repenting her unrequited love and loss. Even as the characters struggle to overcome their emotional upheavals, riots break out, and their lives are turned upside down, ultimately defining their choices.

Yay: Like we said, Kalank was so far being spoken about for the grand and lavish sets being compared to Sanjay Leela Bhansali films. But the real highlights of the film are the performances, the dialogues and the nuanced handling of the complex relationships. The larger-than-life characters and their heart-wrenching performances actually dwarf the magnificent backdrops. The intense chemistry between the characters is the best part of the film.

The endearing and tender moments between Sonakshi and Aditya are in sharp contrast with the searing on-the-brink-romance between Alia and Varun, who are emotionally torn as forbidden lovers. The ache of lost love is epitomized by Madhuri and Dutt beautifully. Not just these, the father-son confrontations, the mother-son showdown, all add up to the film in brilliantly crafted scenes.

All the stars are in top form and the film sees their best performances till date. Varun aces as Zafar channeling the anger and angst through his eyes. His performance in this one makes Badlapur and October look like a warm-up. Alia proves her mettle yet again. She is one of the finest actresses and with Kalank she does it yet again. Dutt speaks volumes with his eyes and Madhuri brings out the pain of heartache beautifully. Sonakshi will remind you of her film Lootera. With Aditya, she makes an impressive outing. Kunal’s grey act is impressive and Kiara does well in her brief role.

Overall, the performances supported by strong dialogues make the maximum impact and score the film all its stars. The narration and the story are interesting and Abhishek Varman’s direction and screenplay score brownie points too. In fact, the director has shown the nuances of each character very sensitively. The music, choreography and cinematography are all top-notch.

Nay: The biggest fail for the film is the length, which could’ve been shorter by atleast 20 minutes. The VFX and CGI were spoilers too. While the bull-fight scene was exciting in concept and execution, but it was not convincing to be a part of the narrative. While the music works, some songs could have been avoided and seem forced in the film. Alia’s introduction scene fails to make a mark and her conversation with her father seems too tame.

The events leading up to the climax also fail to add depth and seem rushed. The film fails to present a balanced view when dealing with the communal aspects. The film uses the Hindu-Muslim conflict as the backdrop and reflects the simmering politically charged agendas fuelled by religion. However, they all seem one-sided.

CineBlitz Verdict: A highly-charged emotional love drama, Kalank rides high on the intense and complex relationships fuelled by romance. The film is entertaining, but leans heavily towards heart-wrenching moments. The film boasts of some brilliantly crafted emotional scenes. Kudos to Abhishek Varman and the cast! The film is a visual treat no doubt and keeps you entertained, but might feel a tad-bit long! A must-watch for die-hard romantics and definitely for the fans of its lead stars!

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Kalank review: Not Varun – Alia, but Sonakshi – Aditya’s chemistry is being talked about by the audience

Varun Dhawan and Alia Bhatt’s period drama set in 1940s has been getting a mixed response, read on…

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Karan Johar’s magnum opus Kalank released this morning (April 17). The film has been trending ever since the makers revealed the first look. While tinsel town gave the film thumbs up, the audience have mixed responses. Read on to know what people are saying about the Abhishek Varman directed multi-starrer.

Kalank has looked grand throughout, while many have loved it, few think it could have been made better. But everyone has been gushing about Madhuri Dixit Nene and the cast. A tweet says, “Just now completed watching in Bangalore  WoW really top notch performances especially  I went for theatre only only for u VD  Me and my MoM watched.She also liked lots Ur expressions, acting, costumes, dance & Climax  I hope u notice this tweet VD.” Another says, “Lastly, I liked a few things. Dev and Satya’s relationship. Dev’s inner conflict and in parts, Varun Dhawan’s convincing performance. He tries to live the life of Zafar but in some parts, he just can’t stop being Varun. .” Check out all the fan reactions the film has got, here:

 

https://twitter.com/divyadjj06/status/1118412510070099970

Kalank is directed by Abhishek Varman and stars Varun Dhawan, Alia Bhatt, Madhuri, Sanjay Dutt, Aditya Roy Kapur and Sonakshi Sinha in pivotal parts. The film was Karan Johar’s dream project that has finally translated on to the 70mm. If you have already watched Kalank , let us know what you think about the film in the comments section below. Also, for more updates and gossip, stay tuned to CineBlitz.

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